How Often Should You Condition Your Hair Black Male

How Often Should You Condition Your Hair Black Male? Answered

In this article, we will be discussing how often should you condition your hair black male. Most black men pay less attention to their hair health.

The focus is mostly on length and grooming, but for better hair appearance and growth, you need healthy hair as a black male.

So how often should you condition your black male hair? For some guys, it’s every morning without fail.

For others, it’s simply when they can find the time. You might be wondering if you do it too much, or if you’re not doing it enough.

Yep, we all take a different approach to conditioning our hair, and there’s plenty of conflicting advice out there about how and how often we should be doing it.

But there’s no point tearing your hair out over it (even if that would technically solve the problem), there’s a simple answer.

According to most dermatologists and barbers, on average guys should wash with shampoo once every two to three days, depending on how greasy your hair gets and no more than three times a week.

But for conditioning your hair, that depends on your hair type and the type of conditioner you’re using. How greasy your hair is also is a major determinant of how often you should condition your black male hair.

 

How Often Should You Condition Your Hair Black Male

 

But then if it’s too greasy the best option is to wash it, and it is very important and necessary that you condition your hair after washing it.

Black male hair is a natural oil and curly but to keep, the nice appearance and nature of the hair you need to pay more attention to your hair health, conditioning and washing your hair on a regular basis can go a long way.

Keep reading this article to know more about the subject on how often should you condition your hair black male;

 

Shampoo Less Frequently

 

Before we go on discussing how often should you condition your hair black male, let’s first discuss how often you should shampoo your hair as this is also a determinant as to how often your hair should be conditioned.

Maybe you’ve heard it before but you still shampoo every day to get the gunk and grease out of your hair from that styling product.

Or maybe you’ve never heard the recommendation and are wondering why. Most shampoos that you can grab off the shelf contain SLS or sodium lauryl sulfate.

It’s a detergent that cleans the hair but unfortunately, it tends to strip away the natural oils that your scalp produces to protect your hair.

That means overexposure to SLS will leave your hair dry and brittle and no one wants that Brillo-pad feels.

The best solution to this is to cut down to shampooing only twice a week, preferably with a product that doesn’t contain SLS. You cause a shampoo that is sulfate-free and blended with natural oils and other ingredients to keep moisture in while it cleans.

 

Moisturize Everyday

 

Your hair has a tendency to dry out across the day, whether from dry air in the fall, indoor heating in the winter, or even hats in the summer or spring, every day is a battle to keep those locks smooth.

Hydrating at the scalp helps keep the hair that grows from it soft and (most importantly) easy to style.

Even when you don’t shampoo (but especially after you do) use a rinse-out conditioner to replenish moisture to your scalp and hair.

Be sure to distribute evenly throughout the scalp and hair for best results. A little every day can go a long way.

 

Choose the Right Styling Product

 

Most of what we have access to at the local drug store is either (1) not formulated for our hair type or (2) full of grease to force things to lay flat. In each case, you’re not doing your hair any favors.

Make sure you’re in the ethnic section, which should usually be more curly-hair friendly, and do your best to avoid options that contain alcohol, mineral oil or petrolatum, good to hold things in place but dries out the hair and gives off that crazy shine.

Opt for a natural solution like our Sleek Water pomade, infused with grapefruit seed oil to moisturize hair and give medium hold without the greasy residue.

Consult your barber for their recommendations as well since more and more shops are carrying trusted products.

 

How Often You Should  Wash your Hair

 

It’s important to maintain good hygiene for the health of your scalp and hair. Black men’s hair is naturally more oily than other types of hair, but it can also be dry or sensitive.

The frequency at which a black man should wash his hair is every 3-4 days. If the scalp has a problem that is causing it to release an odor or oil, then washing daily may be necessary.

If this is the case, then it’s important to condition your hair daily with a moisturizing conditioner.

 

The Length of Your Hair Matters

 

Generally, short hair is easier to clean than long hair. It’s also important that the water temperature is not too hot or cold, this is said to cause brittle and dry ends.

In other words, you don’t want your shampooing routine damaging your scalp and hair. In addition to keeping yourself clean. It’s best to keep your black male hair moisturized with conditioning oils and scalp serums.

 

Organic Shampoo

 

There are some organic shampoos and conditioners that can help your scalp and hair health. The main thing to look for in organic shampoo is natural ingredients, such as tea tree oil and rosemary grass.

Tea tree oil is excellent for combating dandruff and cleaning any dirt or impurities from the scalp. Rosemary grass has ingredients that keep the scalp free of bacteria and itchy.

It’s recommended to use organic shampoo when washing your hair. Natural shampoos are better for all types of hair, including black male hair.

You can also make your own shampoo at home with the natural ingredients you have in the house.

For example, you can mix olive oil, apple cider vinegar, and tea tree shampoo for an effective homemade organic shampoo.

 

Conditioner

 

Conditioner is vital for black hair. It keeps your hair soft, silky, and shiny, minimizing split ends and breakage.  It’s important to use a conditioning treatment after you shampoo your hair at least once a week, if not more often.

Deep conditioners are also available for those seeking intensive moisturizing treatments that hydrate and rejuvenate the scalp and hair.

Moisturizing your black male hair on a weekly basis is very important to prevent frizz, dryness, and breakage. If you want to treat your hair with deep conditioning treatments that hydrate the scalp and promote strength and growth.

Then look for products that contain natural organic ingredients such as peppermint, tea tree oil, and essential oils. You can mix natural ingredients together to make your own oil treatments or buy them from an organic beauty supply store.

Some good examples of natural oils for healthy black male hair are coconut oil, tea tree oil, and avocado oil. If you want a cheap option, then look for olive oil as it is a great moisturizer and a very good conditioner.

Black men with an organic lifestyle prefer to stick to all-natural ingredients to eliminate any chemicals from their hair care routine. If you can’t find organic shampoo, then look for shampoos that contain natural ingredients like tea tree oil and peppermint.

It’s also recommended to use an all-natural conditioner over synthetic ones, which contain chemicals that strip the hair of its moisture.

 

Scalp Serums

 

The scalp is one of the most neglected areas when it comes to maintaining healthy hair. Many people focus on shampooing and conditioning their hair, but fail to give attention to the health of their scalp.

It’s important to put some serum specifically made for your scalp to keep it free from bacteria that cause dandruff, itchiness, and flaking. There are serums that promote hair growth, as well as those that prevent hair loss.

In addition to organic ingredients, some of these products have been known to produce results for black men with balding issues. Serum treatments should be done at least once a week on a clean scalp before going to bed.

In the morning, make sure to wash your hair thoroughly and condition it as usual. Just like serum treatments, natural oils are great for your scalp.

They prolong the effects of the serums and leave you with healthy hair that is well-nourished, strong, smooth, and shiny.

 

Ingredients to Avoid

 

The last point we will be discussing in this article on “how often should you condition your hair black male” is the ingredients you should avoid when choosing a conditioner.

In shampoos are sulfates, parabens, and phthalates. Sulfates are chemical components that create a lather when mixed with water.

Parabens are preservatives used to make products longer lasting by preventing the growth of bacteria. Phthalates are ingredients used to improve the consistency of the shampoo.

These ingredients are bad for all hair types and can cause balding, hair loss, dandruff, and scalp issues. Another ingredient to avoid is sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), which is a known skin irritant.

It causes itching and flaking on the scalp and makes your hair very dry and brittle. When cleaning your scalp, make sure you stay away from SLS and products that contain it.

As with any product that goes on your skin, you need to check the labels for ingredients that can cause certain reactions.

Specifically for black male hair products, organic or all-natural shampoos and conditioners are the way to go to keep your hair healthy, strong, shiny, and manageable.

 

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How Often Do Black People Wash Their Hair?

 

CONCLUSION

 

In conclusion, I hope you found this article on “how often should you condition your hair black Male” useful and helpful. If you did, please share with your friends or family on social media, Thank you for reading.

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